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Hundreds of LatAm Scholars Ask President Obama to Reject Free-Market Model PDF Print E-mail
2008 - October 2008
Written by Newsroom   
Tuesday, 28 October 2008 13:34

US President, Barack Obama 368 academics specializing in Latin America. anticipating a democratic victory in the November 4 US presidential elections sent a letter urging Senator and presidential candidate Barack Obama to become a partner, rather than an adversary, concerning changes already under way in Latin America. 

Above all, the signers are asking Senator Obama to understand the current impetus for progressive change in many of the region's countries: the rejection of what they call failed "free-market" model of economic growth that has been imposed in most countries since the early 1980s.

For this group this period has seen the worst economic growth failure in the region, in terms of per capita GDP, in over a century but also the adoption of more socially just and environmentally sustainable development styles.

The signers expressed their hope that an Obama administration will embrace the opportunity to inaugurate a new period of hemispheric understanding and collaboration for the welfare of the entire Hemisphere.

Most of those signing are members of the Latin American Studies Association, the largest and most influential professional association of its kind in the world. Signers include Eric Hershberg, President of the Latin American Studies Association (LASA) and twelve LASA past presidents, along with over 350 other academics and Latin America experts.

The letter follows:

October 20, 2008

Dear Senator Obama:

We write to offer our congratulations on your campaign and to express our hope that as the next president of the United States you will take advantage of an historic opportunity to improve relations with Latin America.  As scholars of the region, we also wish to convey our analysis regarding the process of change now underway in Latin America.

Just as the people of the United States have begun to debate basic questions regarding the sort of society they want - thanks in part to your own candidacy but also owing to the magnitude of the current financial crisis - so too have the people of Latin America.

In fact, the debate about a just and fair society has been going on in Latin America for more than a decade, and the majority are opting, like you and so many of us in the United States, for hope and change.

As academics personally and professionally committed to development and democracy in Latin America, we are hopeful that during your presidency the United States can become a partner rather than an adversary to the positive changes already under way in the hemisphere.

The current impetus for change in Latin America is a rejection of the model of economic growth that has been imposed in most countries since the early 1980s, a model that has concentrated wealth, relied unsuccessfully on unrestricted market forces to solve deep social problems and undermined human welfare.

The current rejection of this model is broad-based and democratic. In fact, contemporary movements for change in Latin America reveal significantly increased participation by workers and peasants, women, Afro-descendants and indigenous peoples - in a word, the grassroots.

Such movements are coming to power in country after country. They are neither puppets, nor blinded by fanaticism and ideology, as caricatured by some mainstream pundits. To the contrary, these movements deserve our respect, friendship and support.

Latin Americans have often viewed the United States not as a friend but as an oppressor, the guarantor of an international economic system that works against them, rather than for them - the very antithesis of hope and change. The Bush Administration has made matters much worse, and U.S. prestige in the region is now at a historic low. 

Washington's tendency to fight against hope and change has been especially prominent in recent U.S. responses to the democratically elected governments of Venezuela and Bolivia. While anti-American feelings run deep, history demonstrates that these feelings can change.

In the 1930s, after two decades of conflict with the region, the United States swore off intervention and adopted a Good Neighbor Policy. Not coincidentally, it was the most harmonious time in the history of U.S.-Latin American relations. In the 1940s, nearly every country in the region became our ally in World War Two. It can happen again.

There are many other challenges, too. Colombia, the main focus of the Bush Administration's policy, is currently the scene of the second largest humanitarian crisis in the world, with four million internally displaced people. Its government, which criminalizes even peaceful protest, seeks an extension of the free trade policies that much of the hemisphere is already reacting against. 

Cuba has begun a process of transition that should be supported in positive ways, such as through the dialogue you advocate. Mexicans and Central Americans migrate by the tens of thousands to seek work in the United States, where their labor power is much needed but their presence is denigrated by a public that has, since the development of opinion polling in the 1930s, always opposed immigration from anywhere.

The way to manage immigration is not by building a giant wall, but rather, the United States should support more equitable economic development in Mexico and Central America and, indeed, throughout the region. In addition, the U.S. must reconsider drug control policies that have simply not worked and have been part of the problem of political violence, especially in Mexico, Colombia and Peru.

And the U.S. must renew its active support for human rights throughout the region.  Unfortunately, in the eyes of many Latin Americans, the United States has come to stand for the support of inequitable regimes. 

Finally, we implore you to commit your administration to the firm support of constitutional rights, including academic and intellectual freedom.  Most of us are members of the Latin American Studies Association (LASA), the largest professional association of experts on the region, and we have experienced first-hand how the Bush administration's attempt to restrict academic exchange with Cuba is counter-productive and self-defeating.  We hope for an early opportunity to discuss this and other issues regarding Latin America with your administration.

Our hope is that you will embrace the opportunity to inaugurate a new period of hemispheric understanding and collaboration for the common welfare.  We ask for change and not only in the United States.

Sincerely,

SIGNED:

Eric Hershberg, LASA President 2007-09, Professor of Politics and Director of Latin American Studies, Simon Fraser University

Charles R. Hale, LASA Past President (2006-2007), Professor of Anthropology, University of Texas at Austin

Sonia E. Alvarez, LASA Past President (2004-2006), Leonard J. Horwitz Professor of Politics, University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Marysa Navarro Aranguran, LASA Past President (2003-2004), Charles Collis Professor of History, Dartmouth College

Arturo Arias, LASA Past President, (2001-2003), Professor of Spanish and Portuguese University of Texas, Austin

Thomas Holloway, LASA Past President (2000-2001), Professor Of History, University of California, Davis

Susan Eckstein, LASA Past President (1997-98), Professor of Sociology & International Relations, Boston University

Cynthia McClintock, LASA Past President (1994-95), Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, George Washington University

Carmen Diana Deere, LASA Past President (1992-94), Professor of Food and Resource Economics and Director, Center for Latin American Studies, University of Florida

Lars Schoultz, LASA Past President (1991-92), William Rand Kenan, Jr., Professor of Political Science, UNC, Chapel Hill

Jean Franco, LASA Past President (1989-91), Emeritus Professor, Columbia University

Helen I. Safa, LASA Past President (1983-85), Emeritus Professor of Anthropology and Latin American Studies, University of Florida

Paul L. Doughty, LASA Past President (1974-75), Distinguished Service Professor, Emeritus of Anthropology and Latin American Studies, University of Florida

Marí­a Rosa Olivera-Williams, LASA Past Congress Chair (2001-2003), Associate Professor of Latin American Literature, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana

---------

Thomas Abercrombie, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director, Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, NYU

Holly Ackerman, Ph.D. Librarian for Latin America and Iberia, Duke University

Judith Adler Hellman, Professor of Social and Political Science, York University, Toronto

Norma Alarcon, Professor Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley
Alfonso Alvarez, Social Worker, Boston College Graduate School

Wayne F. Anderson, Professor of History and Latin American Studies, Johnson C. Smith University, Charlotte, NC

Robert Andolina, Assistant Professor of International Studies, Seattle University

Frances R. Aparicio, Professor, Latin American and Latino Studies Program, University of Illinois at Chicago

Kirsten Appendini, El Colegio de México, Mexico

Juan Manuel Arbona, Associate Professor, Growth and Structure of Cities Program, Bryn Mawr College

Benjamin Arditi, Professor, Centro de Estudios Politicos, UNAM, Mexico, DF

Mauricio Arenas - CUPW Local 626

Andres Avellaneda, Emeritus Professor, Spanish and Latin American Studies, U. of Florida

William Avilés, Asociate Professor of Political Science, University of Nebraska, Kearney

Dra. Emperatriz Arreaza-Camero, Investigadora adscrita al Cine Club Universitario de Maracaibo, Universidad de Zulia

Florence E. Babb, Vada Allan Yeomans Professor of Women's Studies, University of Florida

Comments (20)Add Comment
A Bit Presumptuous?
written by ACME, October 29, 2008
"Hundreds of LatAm Scholars Ask President Obama to Reject Free-Market Model" ? ! ? ! ?

While I might disagree with the with their requests (is a "just and fair society" compatible with "commitment to development and democracy"?) And, after all we have heard recently about William Ayers and his colleagues (or is that comrades?) I trust academics even less than I trust politicians. I do however, hope whoever is the next POTUS does more to work with South America.

You should all just keep in mind Barry ain't the President yet!

PS - Was this letter also sent to Senator McCain? If not, why not?
Why not?
written by Wilson, October 29, 2008
Are you kidding?
More than Presumptuous !
written by ch.c., October 29, 2008

Just re-read or re-listen LULA attacks against the USA and/or Bush, while the USA and/or Bush never did so !

Millions of brazilians Scholars should write to LULA and el al, not 368 to Obama !!!!!!

Furthermore it is quite interesting to see the names of those who signed, mostly from LATAM origin !
I bet that not many FOREIGN origin people could even have such titles and jobs...in LATAM !!!!!!

LULA is more and more closer in his speeches than CHAVEZ !!!!!!

Viva Brazil, Viva Venuezuela, both being a Banana Republic disguised in Democracy !!!!!!

Vote buying ? No problem since even pardoned by the lawmakers. themselves corrupted to the roots !
It is like chosing criminals jurors to judge other criminals !
You Can Ask Obama Anything You Want
written by Ric, October 29, 2008
But since he thinks he's God, he probably can't be reasoned with.
Hope and Change: it's a universal aspiration to turn the page on failed W/McSame policies
written by D Ohio, October 29, 2008
The signatories noted above appear to be mostly faculty at US colleges and universities. As such, they should be highly qualified to understand the region they are studying and referring to here in this letter. Anyone coming into the new administration should respect their judgment which recognizes the need for change and more collaborative relations with other nations, our neighbors.

This election is a referendum rejecting the Bush-McCain polarization fighting "us vs. them", "my way or the highway" "build up the walls (but borrow lots of foreign money to let our kids pay back later as we run up huge deficits on a phony war for oil)" that has so bankrupted our nation's credibility and standing in the international world. No doubt that Latin American democracies need improvement, but so does our own government if you haven't noticed. zThe USA has a lot of housecleaning to do right now. Just today, another Republican Sen Ted Stevens was convicted of corruption taking gifts and home renovations from an oil crony. No doubt the paper shredders are running double time right now at the White House as W-Cheney and Co. prepare to vacate.

Obama is with the people, for the people, by the people and of the people, through his community organizing experience. I'm sure he'll sit down and talk to our neighbors. He might even open a new leaf of positive cooperation with the region, based on a concept more proactive than waging drug wars.

Also i thought the writers were being generous saying tens of thousands of mexicans cross to US for work. Hundreds of thousands, millions is more likely.

A rational approach to work with our neighbors, is likely to be developed by an Obama administration. I look forward to it, refreshing after the head in the sand approaches of the past 8 years.
Brazil, slums,education
written by Archie Haase, October 29, 2008
I see rio slums, poor public schools, poor teachers, terrible medical care. I see and talk to young Brazilians who always compare what they can buy ,and at what cost to what they see in movies and television in the US. What can the US do to help? Not much I am afraid. I cannot see any free market economy worling long tern at least here in Brazil. In fact I think it is destroying Brazil in some ways.
film producer
written by john rock, October 29, 2008
Barach Obama, As an ardent supporter of your presidential aspirations, I ask that you support this just appeal. sincerely, john rock
thanks but no thanks
written by Andrew Labrador, October 29, 2008
I wonder how many of you Professors from respected universities have been able to enjoy comfortable lives in the US: a good vehicle, a decent dwelling , personal safety and how much would you miss if that was taken away by your oversimplified view of the world. The numbers don't lie, the more open the society and the more free the market of capital are, the more innovation and better standards of living we have. Don't we all enjoy all the new technologies, the web, your ipod, medicinal advances and such? Thank the free markets and flow of capitals for all of that. What do you propose? the unsustainable levels of corruption and poor street safety that has overtaken the streets of Caracas thanks to the last 10 years of "revolutionary" ideas hanging only from record petro-income? no thanks.
I believe Obama is very well qualified and will bring the right balance needed in this moment, I welcome him also, and if my understanding of his proposals of the American Dream are correct I sure hope you all are in for a big disappointment.
A Bit Presumptuous?.....Just a bit?
written by VinnyCarioca, October 29, 2008
And, after all we have heard recently about William Ayers and his colleagues (or is that comrades?) I trust academics even less than I trust politicians. I do however, hope whoever is the next POTUS does more to work with South America.


I was employed by a software firm in Congers, N.Y. in the mid 80's....a few short years after the Weather Underground- founded by Bill Ayres, Bernadene Dohrn, and David Gilbert, in concert with several members of the Black Liberation Army- MURDERED 2 Nyack, N.Y. police officers and a Brinks security guard in a failed effort to finance their "revolution". I knew, firsthand, what that officially classified terrorist event did to that community and that Bill Ayres became the legal guardian to one of the murderer's (David Gilbert and Kathy Boudin) children. 'But....Ayres was just a guy from his neighborhood'.
Would anyone on this site be friends (and I personally witnessed him characterize his relationship as a friendship) with someone like that? Would you launch your political career from that person's home? Would you be employed as a Chairman (Chicago Annenberg Challenge) by someone like that?
I'm just getting warmed up
written by VinnyCarioca, October 29, 2008
368 academics specializing in Latin America. anticipating a democratic victory in the November 4 US presidential elections sent a letter urging Senator and presidential candidate Barack Obama to become a partner, rather than an adversary, concerning changes already under way in Latin America.


So the Bush administration, along with Greenspan, Snow, Bernanke, Paulson intentionally debase the US $ and spend like the most liberal of the liberal liberals, drive up asset prices, commodities, China, the Bovespa, Lula's economic prowess.........and ultimately have become the adversary?
What changes were already under way in S.A.? Chavez? Morales?

Above all, the signers are asking Senator Obama to understand the current impetus for progressive change in many of the region's countries: the rejection of what they call failed "free-market" model of economic growth that has been imposed in most countries since the early 1980s

Well......maybe I'm wrong..didn't Lula essentially adopt the failed "free-market" model instituted by his predecessor to build a platform that recently mocked the failure of the U.S. economy?

The signers expressed their hope that an Obama administration will embrace the opportunity to inaugurate a new period of hemispheric understanding and collaboration for the welfare of the entire Hemisphere.

Well, he is more of a protectionist.....until the Canadians directly ask his economic team if they are serious. Their reply was that (paraphrasing) 'it's just political positioning'.




And further more......
written by VinnyCarioca, October 29, 2008
Cuba has begun a process of transition that should be supported in positive ways, such as through the dialogue you advocate. Mexicans and Central Americans migrate by the tens of thousands to seek work in the United States, where their labor power is much needed but their presence is denigrated by a public that has, since the development of opinion polling in the 1930s, always opposed immigration from anywhere.

Interesting....since groups of 3 or more people associating in public will draw the full force of a Cuban totalitarian police state. I don't blame citizens of Cuba (whom are legally accepted in the U.S. as political pawns), Mexico, Central America or any politically, economic, socially oppressive corrupt countries to try to gain entry into a country, that for decades encouraged them. The sad part is that they have become a net drain on the economy of the U.S. and have unfairly been lumped in to the OTHER half of illegal immigrants that have overstayed visas and have real means. The assertion that Americans 'oppose immigration from anywhere' is absurd. My family emigrated from Sicily at the turn of the 20th. century. WE ARE A NATION OF IMMIGRANTS. Sound familiar my Brazilian friends?
...
written by VinnyCarioca, October 29, 2008
The way to manage immigration is not by building a giant wall, but rather, the United States should support more equitable economic development in Mexico and Central America and, indeed, throughout the region. In addition, the U.S. must reconsider drug control policies that have simply not worked and have been part of the problem of political violence, especially in Mexico, Colombia and Peru.

A wall to keep people out or to keep them in? Remittances from the U.S. to Mexico generate more revenue for the Mexican government than oil. What does that tell you?
What is the alternative to drug control policies?
...
written by VinnyCarioca, October 29, 2008
Finally, we implore you to commit your administration to the firm support of constitutional rights, including academic and intellectual freedom. Most of us are members of the Latin American Studies Association (LASA), the largest professional association of experts on the region, and we have experienced first-hand how the Bush administration's attempt to restrict academic exchange with Cuba is counter-productive and self-defeating. We hope for an early opportunity to discuss this and other issues regarding Latin America with your administration.

Our hope is that you will embrace the opportunity to inaugurate a new period of hemispheric understanding and collaboration for the common welfare. We ask for change and not only in the United States.


And we would also like to laud the Castro brothers for their support of human rights and academic/intellectual freedom. Never mind the thousands of Cubans over the decades who desperately tried to escape one of the remaining totalitarian police states in the world that actually still exist.
CH.C
written by VinnyCarioca, October 29, 2008
Also i thought the writers were being generous saying tens of thousands of mexicans cross to US for work. Hundreds of thousands, millions is more likely.

A rational approach to work with our neighbors, is likely to be developed by an Obama administration. I look forward to it, refreshing after the head in the sand approaches of the past 8 years.


There is absolutely no difference between McCain and Obama on economic migrants from Mexico. McCain's nickname has been "Amnesty John" for years....especially since he teamed up with Ted Kennedy on the failed "comprehensive immigration reform". It's a win-win. Republicans import cheap and exploitable labor, while Democrat's, exploit the same labor force as part of their class warfare voting base. No difference, no difference, no difference. You would think that SOMEONE would want to discuss the process of expediting LEGAL immigration. It's not happening my fellow Scorpio.
Sorry CH.C -my fellow Scorpio ....I meant D Ohio
written by VinnyCarioca, October 29, 2008
See prior post smilies/grin.gif smilies/cheesy.gif smilies/cheesy.gif
He might even open a new leaf of positive cooperation with the region,
written by ch.c., October 29, 2008
Who is this idiot ü
Does he mean the USA should again DOUBLE OR TRIPLE their trade deficit ?????

And about ""Hundreds of LatAm Scholars Ask President Obama to Reject Free-Market Model"
What does that mean ?
the ones with a HUGE trade deficit (the USA and the EU) with emerging nations MUST REDUCE - ELIMINATE their trade deficit with emerging nations ?

Me too, I sign up....right now !!!!!!

Think about it !

ALL BRIC MEMBERS HAVE A HUGE TRADE SURPLUS WITH THE USA AND EU !

We should not build a wall for trade, simply charge as much as we are charged for our exports !
If not enough, then do RECIPROCAL TRADE.......on a DOLLAR FOR DOLLAR BASIS !!!!!!

This is exactly what the 368 signatories PLUS MYSELF are requesting-------- Reject Free-Market Model----- as the letter clearly stated !!!!!

Right or Not ?
If not, please explain clearly !!!!!!
Why should GM cars be made in Russia, China and Brazil....and not in the USA...for further exports ?
Are emerging nations investing in the USA to produce sugar or ethanol or textile....in the USA ? Of course not !

But with my regular "lemonish" comments, some exception should be made :
STEELS, REFINERIES and all industries that are HIGHLY POLLUTING !!!!!
EMERGING NATIONS LOVE THAT POLLUTION ! THEY WANT AND BEG FOR MORE !
Brazil is building new oil refineries to export gasoline to the USA !!!!!!!
Because the USA have not built ONE new refinery in the last 30 years due to environmental reasons !!!!!!

Therefore, this should be allowed, since Brazilians are begging and craving for more refineries !
Same for steel mills ! Thus far Brazil export iron ore to China which then is transformed to steel for either local needs or....RE-EXPORTS !
Therefore China that will surpass the U.S. pollution in a year or two, should be nice enough, to allow BRAZIL to be drown a little further with more pollution. And this will even be less costly for having first the iron ore shipped to China.

We should even finance the new steel mills !

Sure, Brazilians workers will have to stay competitive against China.
Therefore they should have the same wages as China workers !!!!!

Right or not ??????

China is sufficiently polluted, HIGH pollution growth should be transferred in.....BRAZIL....since this is the Brazilian mid and long term strategy under the REIGN OF HIS EXCELLENCE ROBING THE CROOK....SECOND TO GOD....AS HE HIMSLEF PROCLAIMED PUBLICLY !!!!!!

Just think about it !!!!!!

smilies/cheesy.gif smilies/grin.gif smilies/cheesy.gif smilies/grin.gif smilies/cheesy.gif smilies/grin.gif
Furthermore concerning..... the signatories of the letter
written by ch.c., October 29, 2008
My point is TOTALLY different to the one that disagreed with my initial arguments.

My point was :

A) a foreigner, legally resident in the USA, CAN find a job in a good U.S. University IF HE HAS the qualifications !
B) a foreigner, legally resident in Brazil, CANNOT find a job in a good or even bad Brazilian University even if he has the qualifications from a country far more developed and educated than Brazilians teachers !!!!!

If you disagree with me, just surf the Net and type.....finding a job in Brazil.

You will find hundreds of proofs about what I am saying !!!!!!
Therefore I am NOT INSINUATING ANYTHING INCORRECT.

JUST SAD PROVEN FACTS AND REALITY, WETHER YOU LIKE OR NOT.
...
written by João da Silva, October 29, 2008
Hundreds of LatAm Scholars Ask President Obama to Reject Free-Market Model


I enjoyed reading the open letter addressed to Obama by the "LatAm Scholars, as well as the comments made by several bloggers . The comments made by our regular bloggers Vinny and Ch.C are of great interest, since they know more about the ground reality in Brazil.

Here are my observations:

1) While going though the list of the "Scholars", some seem to be LatAm born and others acquired their knowledge though reading books and visiting LatAm briefly (and talking to their fellow academics).

2) While I am not questioning their wisdom of not sending a copy to Sen.McCain, I do question the reason for not sending similar letters to the "Rulers" of the respective countries in LatAm on which they have specialized their "research" or where they were born.

3) IMHO, whether Obama wins or McCain does, it is not going to affect the lives of the common man in LatAm, as neither of them is capable of influencing our "Rulers" to change the policy. So I recommend that they enjoy their tenure track academic post without interfering in the decision making process of our able "Rulers", bearing in mind that they know what is good for their subjects.

4) Finally in response to the comment of Ch.C:

B) a foreigner, legally resident in Brazil, CANNOT find a job in a good or even bad Brazilian University even if he has the qualifications from a country far more developed and educated than Brazilians teachers !!!!!


With due respect Ch.C, we do not need these foreigners to come and tell us what to do. We have highly qualified Professors most of whom were trained locally and many in Sorbonne. smilies/wink.gif
With due respect Ch.C, we do not need these foreigners to come and tell us what to do. We have highly qualified Professors most of whom were trained locally and many in Sorbonne.
written by ch.c., October 29, 2008
Doubtful you learn advanced, maths, sciences, IT, software programming in La Sorbonne !!!!!!

Furthermore, just look at the ranking of the World Best 200 Univetsities.

There is only one brazilian, SP University, ranked 196th !!!!!

Sadly true !!!!!!!

Thus funny your statement "We have highly qualified Professors most of whom were trained locally and many in Sorbonne" that totally prove what I have said !!!!!!!!

Another Brazilian Fairy Tale !!!!!!
Swallowed only by kids ! Young kids....who have not yet gone to Brazilian junior schools.

So much true that even Brazilians ranked themselves 46th out of 50......in test !!!!!

Viva Brazil, where the biggest growth is NON or LOW education !!!!!!

Once more I challenge anyone to prove me wrong with facts and stats that can be checked !!!!

More honesty and simple there is not !!!!!


Ohhhhhhh...... by the way my liliputian country with a population of 7,8 millions has 6 Universities ranked withing the World Best 200 !!!!!!!!!

Sorry again, these are NOT my ranking estimates.

Last but not least, for MBA degree the IMD in Lausanne - Switzerland, here are the various rankings from various sources

No. 1 Worldwide (200smilies/cool.gif Financial Times Executive Education

No. 1 worldwide (200smilies/cool.gif The Economist MBA Program
No. 1 in Europe (2007) Forbes
MBA Program
No. 1 in Europe (2007)

Financial Times
Open Enrollment Programs

No. 1 in Europe (2007) Financial Times
Partnership Programs
No. 1 worldwide (2007) FT "Ranking of the Rankings" MBA Program
No. 2 in Europe (2007) The Economist MBA Program
No. 2 worldwide (2007) Wall Street Journal
MBA Program
No. 3 worldwide (2007) Financial Times Executive Education



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smilies/wink.gif smilies/cool.gif
Ch.C!
written by João da Silva, October 29, 2008
Doubtful you learn advanced, maths, sciences, IT, software programming in La Sorbonne !!!!!!


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